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What You Need to Know About the Consumer Protection Act 1986: Aims, Objectives and Remedies | PDF Free


Aims and Objectives of Consumer Protection Act 1986 PDF Free




In this article, we will discuss the aims and objectives of the Consumer Protection Act 1986 (COPRA), which is an important legislation for the protection of consumer rights in India. We will also explain the main features, benefits and drawbacks of this act, as well as how to file a complaint under it. Finally, we will provide some sources where you can download the full text of this act in PDF format for free.




aims and objectives of consumer protection act 1986 pdf free



What is Consumer Protection Act 1986?




The Consumer Protection Act 1986 is an act of the Parliament of India that was enacted to provide better protection of the interests of consumers and for that purpose to make provision for the establishment of consumer councils and other authorities for the settlement of consumer disputes and for matters connected with it. [1]


The act defines a consumer as any person who buys or hires any goods or services for a consideration which has been paid or promised or partly paid or partly promised or under any system of deferred payment. It also includes any user of such goods or services other than the person who buys or hires them. [1]


The act covers all goods and services except those exempted by the Central Government by notification. It applies to all sectors whether public, private or cooperative. It also extends to the whole of India except the state of Jammu and Kashmir. [1]


Why was Consumer Protection Act 1986 enacted?




The Consumer Protection Act 1986 was enacted to address the growing problems faced by consumers in India due to unfair trade practices, defective goods, deficient services, exploitation and deception by traders and service providers. [2]


The act was also inspired by the United Nations Guidelines for Consumer Protection adopted by the General Assembly in 1985, which urged member states to adopt appropriate measures to protect consumer interests. [2]


The act was also intended to promote and protect the rights of consumers such as:


  • The right to be protected against the marketing of goods and services which are hazardous to life and property.



  • The right to be informed about the quality, quantity, potency, purity, standard and price of goods and services.



  • The right to be assured of access to a variety of goods and services at competitive prices.



  • The right to be heard and to be assured that consumer interests will receive due consideration at appropriate forums.



  • The right to seek redressal against unfair trade practices or unscrupulous exploitation of consumers.



  • The right to consumer education. [1]



What are the main features of Consumer Protection Act 1986?




The main features of the Consumer Protection Act 1986 are as follows:


Consumer rights and responsibilities




The act recognizes six basic rights of consumers as mentioned above and also lays down certain responsibilities for them to exercise these rights effectively. Some of these responsibilities are:


  • Be aware of the various goods and services available in the market and their prices, quality and standards.



  • Be informed of the terms and conditions of purchase, warranty, guarantee, after-sales service, etc. and read them carefully before buying or hiring any goods or services.



  • Be careful and cautious while buying or hiring any goods or services and avoid impulsive or hasty decisions.



  • Be fair and honest in dealing with traders and service providers and do not indulge in unfair or unethical practices.



  • Be responsible for the proper use and maintenance of the goods and services bought or hired and follow the instructions and guidelines provided by the manufacturers or sellers.



  • Be involved in consumer movements and organizations and participate in their activities to promote consumer welfare. [2]



Consumer protection councils




The act provides for the establishment of consumer protection councils at the national, state and district level to increase consumer awareness and advise the government on consumer-related policies and issues. [2]


The National Consumer Protection Council consists of the Minister in charge of consumer affairs in the Central Government as its chairman and such other official and non-official members representing various interests as may be prescribed by the Central Government. [1]


The State Consumer Protection Council consists of the Minister in charge of consumer affairs in the State Government as its chairman and such other official and non-official members representing various interests as may be prescribed by the State Government. [1]


The District Consumer Protection Council consists of the Collector of the district (by whatever name called) as its chairman and such other official and non-official members representing various interests as may be prescribed by the State Government. [1]


Consumer redressal agencies




The act provides for the establishment of consumer redressal agencies at the national, state and district level to adjudicate consumer disputes and provide speedy and simple justice to consumers. [2]


The National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission (NCDRC) is established by the Central Government. It deals with matters of more than 100 million (US$1.3 million). It also hears appeals against the orders of the State Commissions. It is headed by a sitting or retired judge of the Supreme Court of India as it